This photo is the ground across which the 2nd Battalion, 4th Infantry…

Bryce Ros

This photo is the ground across which the 2nd Battalion, 4th Infantry Division, crossed on the morning of June 6, 1944. This picture was taken with the low tide not being in for hours. That beach turns in to the longest, most exposed areas of attack you can imagine. From the end of the ramp to the rocks is 100 yards at that point. There are also clearly former MG Nests which created fields of fire interlocking up and down the Beach to Point-Du-Hoc which can’t be seen fully, it is at the farthest part on the right. Let’s not forget either the 60 odd 88’s, to mortars to 105mm battery’s up the Causeways, pre-sighted by Rommel years before the invasion. There is no defilade at all until you reach the tiny area above the rocks, and it’s not full defilade. Those were men made of extremely special stuff that took that sprint, very few in the 1st wave survived. I will post some of the memorial one of the most beautiful, but tearful places I have been blessed to visit. (Utah Beach)