NCAA Needs to Do Right Thing With McCoy Transfer

The NCAA needs to use some common sense with USC recruit Bru McCoy

His name is Bru McCoy and outside of some rabid college football recruiting sites and hives of college football interests at USC and Texas you probably haven't heard much of him.

Let's fast track for a minute.

Bru McCoy is a five-star wide receiver recruit who came out of Mater Dei High in Southern California as a hot prospect who was being heavily courted by USC and (among the leaders) Texas.

His original decision over the winter was to stay close to home and enroll at USC in January.

But when then newly named USC offensive coordinator Kliff Kingsbury backed out of his job to become the head coach of the National Football League's Arizona Cardinals, McCoy had a change of heart and headed to Texas.

Not surprisingly, McCoy was an instant star in the making in Austin. He was going to be a key in the Longhorns climb back to the Top 10. He played in the spring game and got to know Texas QB Sam Ehlinger and Longhorn coach Tom Herman.

But he was also an 18-year old kid who was homesick and missed his family and friends and high school teammates, many of whom were headed for or already at USC.

According to a story in the Los Angeles Times, McCoy intends to transfer back to USC. He is now back in Southern California, where he attended his high school graduation and now wants to stay home and transfer USC.

No problem, you say. He can do that. But according to NCAA regulations that would mean he would have to sit out a season before playing for the Trojans.

Normally, we would have no problem with that rule. It slows down the fast paced world of major college recruiting where talent is open to the highest bidder in many instances.

The latest buzz phrase in college football and basketball is the "transfer portal''' which is how the NCAA is dealing with the rash of transfers, as well of graduates who still have eligibility remaining and want to switch schools.

We could spend an afternoon talking about that and the theory of colleges exploiting the talents of their "student'-athletes'' while limiting their benefits schools make from marketing those talents.

We could also debate the fairness of the transfer rule.

The NCAA, with some justification, has been labeled as tone deaf in the wait it governs on numerous issues.

In the case of Bru McCoy, the NCAA's decision seems obvious.

This is an 18 year old kid who was thrown into a world of high stakes poker without any experience. He made a decision and then changed his mind and then changed his mind again.

Reportedly, he now wants to go to USC. People at two schools are whispering in his ear. He could stick with the decision to stay at Texas,, he could go to USC and has the right to appeal to the NCAA to waive the one year transfer rule.

If that happens, the NCAA should grant it immediately.

Everyone makes mistakes, including 5-star recruits. But this is still a kid making a career decision which will affect his life.

Bru McCoy has barely left a footprint at Texas. If he leaves, life will go on in Austin.

He has yet to leave an impression at USC, but now it appears that is where he wants to be.

The NCAA should let him--without restrictions and do it immediately.



Mark Blaudschun
EditorMark Blaudschun
Mark Blaudschun
EditorMark Blaudschun
Mark Blaudschun
EditorMark Blaudschun
Mark Blaudschun
EditorMark Blaudschun
Mark Blaudschun
EditorMark Blaudschun
Mark Blaudschun
EditorMark Blaudschun
Mark Blaudschun
EditorMark Blaudschun
Mark Blaudschun
EditorMark Blaudschun
Mark Blaudschun
EditorMark Blaudschun
Mark Blaudschun
EditorMark Blaudschun